The Nance Lab

Department of Chemical Engineering
University of Washington
Box 351750
3781 Okanogan Lane NE 
Seattle, WA, 98195-1750

nancelab@gmail.com

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Teaching

Building knowledge for the next generation

CHEME 330 Transport Processes I

Course Description: This course covers diffusive transport of momentum, heat, and mass; general aspects of fluid flow; the Navier-Stokes equations; and one-dimensional flow with engineering applications.

CHEME 498 Technical Communication in Chemical Engineering

Course Description: The goal of this course is to prepare chemical engineering students with the individual and collaborative technical writing, presentation, and research skills necessary to be effective technical communicators in academic and professional environments. This class provides equivalent or replacement credit for ENGR 231 or provides engineering elective credit.

CHEME 434/534 Physiology and Nanomedicine

Course Description: This course is designed to provide students with an understanding of the physiological principles that influence the use of nanoscale systems in the human body. We will specifically focus on physiological principles related to the transport and partitioning of nanotherapeutics to different organs in the body. The course is divided into subunits that focus on a general target “organ”, including blood and the cardiovascular system, the GI tract, the kidneys and liver, the brain, and the lung. In each subunit, the basic physiological principles that drive function of each organ will be discussed, followed by analysis of the relevant barrier to nanomedicine applications for that organ, and a literature review of nanomedicine applications for diseases of that organ. 

CHEME 435 Mass Transfer and Separations

Course Description: This course covers mass transfer principles and principles of separation by equilibrium and rate processes. In addition, the course discusses how these principles influence equipment design.

Have you taken a class for Professor Nance and need a recommendation letter? Submit a recommendation letter request from Professor Nance here: rec letter page.